Biosimilars

Biosimilars provide more options for care at a lower cost for patients, but due to Medicare’s perverse incentives, many pharmacy benefit managers and health plans have been slow to prioritize biosimilars, leaving savings on the table.
Adoption of biosimilars continues to rise in the United States, but oncologists’ knowledge regarding these agents has not kept pace, according to data presented at the virtual 2021 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Quality Care Symposium.
On September 21, 2021, the Association for Accessible Medicines (AAM), the trade association of generic and biosimilar manufacturers, released topline findings from its forthcoming 2021 U.S. Generic & Biosimilar Medicines Savings Report highlighting the value of generic and biosimilar drugs.
Although the role of biosimilars in the treatment of patients with cancer has been under review by payers and providers for several years, there remains conflicting application regarding policy and strategy.
It is estimated that 350 million people worldwide use biologics on a regular basis to treat their medical conditions.
Biologic drugs, which include therapeutic proteins and monoclonal antibodies, are large complex molecules typically manufactured in genetically engineered organisms.
In recent years, biologics have increasingly been used for the treatment and supportive care of patients with various serious illnesses, including cancer.
On July 1, 2021, 28 patient advocacy groups submitted a letter demonstrating their support for H.R. 2815, also known as the Bolstering Innovative Options to Save Immediately on Medicines (BIOSIM) Act, which aims to increase Medicare reimbursement for health systems that prescribe biosimilars to patients.
Rapid adoption of FDA-approved biosimilars is feasible, measurable, and scalable—and pharmacists should lead the charge, according to data presented at the virtual 2021 American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Care Symposium.
Page 1 of 5
Results 1 - 10 of 47