Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy

Chicago, IL—The second-generation chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy bb2121, engineered to target B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), a protein on the surface of certain myeloma cells, displayed continuing efficacy and safety in an update of a phase 1 clinical trial in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, according to data presented at ASCO 2018. Currently, no CAR T-cell therapy has been approved for patients with multiple myeloma.

“The wide range of potential immune-related adverse events requires multidisciplinary, collaborative management by providers across the clinical spectrum,” according to Michael A. Postow, MD, and colleagues.
The NCCN’s first guideline for side effects from immunotherapy recognizes a new spectrum of events in patients who are receiving immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy.

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy has had excellent results in late-stage leukemia and varying degrees of success in some other hematologic cancers, but thus far, solid tumors have not responded to this therapy.

Among the 84 patients, 7 had partial responses with the combination of atezolizumab (Tecentriq) and cobimetinib (Cotellic). The median duration of response was 14.3 months.

The combination cohort consisted of 119 patients who received nivolumab 3 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks for 4 doses followed by nivolu­mab 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks. The median follow-up was 13.4 months.

“We find that T-cells with highly activated glycolysis pathways ended up performing worse when we tried to make them into CAR T-Cells. Substituting and supplementing heavily with fatty acids did seem to improve this a little,” said David M. Barrett, MD, PhD, at the 2018 American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

The FDA granted accelerated approval to nivolumab based on a notable clinical benefit in a subset of patients who progressed after receiving the standard first-line chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan.

“The main rationale from the cytotoxic era is to increase efficacy by combining agents that have different mechanisms and nonoverlapping toxicities. The question is whether we can replace nonspecific cytotoxic agents with a specific, more effective immunotherapeutic,” said Donna Przepiorka, MD, PhD, at ASH 2017.

As the number of patients receiving immune checkpoint blockade grows, the combination of radiation and immunotherapy has become increasingly relevant, particularly in the palliative care setting, where radiation therapy is used to treat painful lesions or brain metastases.

Page 1 of 3
Results 1 - 10 of 29