TON - December 2011, Vol 4, No 8

The systemic amyloidoses are a group of complex diseases caused by tissue deposition of misfolded proteins that results in progressive organ damage.1 The incidence of immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis (also referred to as primary amyloidosis) is approximately one-tenth that of multiple myeloma,1 a more common cancer of the bone marrow plasma cells.

TON - December 2011, Vol 4, No 8 published on December 30, 2011 in Supportive Care

The red, golden, and candy cane beets are the perfect addition to any winter menu. Beets are the ideal vegetable to incorporate into your winter meals to add immune-boosting, phytonutrient-rich compounds into your diet. With the cold and flu season upon us, it is time to look to the foods we eat as a weapon and take advantage of their potential to keep us healthy.

TON - December 2011, Vol 4, No 8 published on December 28, 2011

After launching the Survivors Teaching Students program of the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance (OCNA) in 2008, and this year organizing the Ovarian Cancer Advocacy Alliance (OCAA) of San Diego, I have focused on 3 aspects of advocacy: 1) Effect change in the way medical doctors approach diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer by educating the medical community, patient organizations, and the community at large to achieve early diagnosis and improved treatment options; 2) Advance ovarian cancer research toward early diagnosis and improved quality of care; and 3) Address legislative issues

TON - December 2011, Vol 4, No 8 published on December 28, 2011

Older cancer patients are significantly underrepresented in clinical trials, and it may be time to rethink eligibility for oncology clinical trials, according to Martine Extermann, MD, PhD, professor of oncology at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

TON - December 2011, Vol 4, No 8 published on December 28, 2011 in Breast Cancer

Dual HER2 blockade with trastuzumab plus pertuzumab combined with docetaxel chemotherapy significantly extended progression- free survival (PFS) by about 6 months compared to trastuzumab plus docetaxel plus placebo in patients with metastatic HER2+ breast cancer, according to results from the CLEOPATRA trial presented at the CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

Breastlink is a network of comprehensive breast centers that specifically focuses on providing treatment and care to women with breast cancer. The Breastlink Medical Group was founded in 1995 by John Link, MD, and now operates 5 breast cancer centers in California (4 in Southern California). Today, Breastlink offers a team-based, patient-centered approach to care, as well as a focus on research into the causes of and the cure for breast cancer.

TON - December 2011, Vol 4, No 8 published on December 27, 2011 in Genetic Counseling

You may or may not have heard the name Kathleen Maxian, but it is likely you have encountered women like her in your practice without knowing it. Kathleen has been featured in several news stories lately, including in the New York Times and on CNN. Her sister, Eileen Kelly, was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 40 and underwent testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) gene mutations. She was found to be negative. Two years later, Kathleen was diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

Patients with rectal cancer who use a combination of chemotherapy (capecitabine) with 5 weeks of radiation (50 Gy) prior to surgery may have an 88% chance of surviving the cancer 3 years after treatment, according to results presented at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology held October 2-6, 2011, in Miami Beach, Florida.

A higher dose of radiation (74 Gy) does not improve overall survival for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has spread to the lymph nodes, compared to the standard radiation dose (60 Gy), according to a new study, according to results presented at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology held October 2-6, 2011, in Miami Beach, Florida.

TON - December 2011, Vol 4, No 8 published on December 21, 2011 in In the News

Although cancer patients who undergo radiation therapy frequently have acute and chronic skin reactions, there are no hard and fast guidelines on management of radiation-induced skin reactions or the best products to use. Each center or practice should develop its own clinical guide about how patients should manage skin reactions and which products are recommended for patient use, said Maureen McQuestion, RN, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.


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