Ovarian Cancer

The ovarian cancer patients’ internal dialogue may delay a cancer diagnosis and can also overestimate the capability of chemotherapy.
BRCA wild-type tumors are more common in women with ovarian cancer and may need higher doses of the tumor-targeting PARP inhibitor.
The rise in the number of cancer drugs taken orally has placed a renewed focus on the importance—and challenges—of patient adherence to self-administered oral medications.
While Medicare Part D enrollees may see their out-of-pocket expenses, deductibles, and premiums increase in 2020, protections of the drugs used in cancer treatment will remain in place.
Ovarian cancer not only exacts a high mortality rate, but also affects the physical, mental, and financial health of those diagnosed with the disease.
Epidemiologic studies reveal population-based disparities in ovarian cancer morbidity and mortality rates.
Genetic, menstrual, and other factors have been associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer.
Current screening practices for ovarian cancer continue to result in late-stage diagnoses with consequent poor prognoses.
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Ovarian cancers with BRCA mutations are less immunogenic than other DNA re­pair–deficient tumors. Targeting the DNA damage response using PARP inhibitors may help to improve the modest responses of ovarian cancer seen with single-agent immune checkpoint inhibitors.
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