Oncology Pharmacy

In 1979, Falck and colleagues described the presence of chemotherapy in the urine of nurses caring for patients who had received chemotherapy.1 The discovery that merely handling chemotherapy drugs can lead to absorption of the chemotherapy drugs has been key in the re-evaluation of safety in healthcare environments. In 2004, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) alert noted that skin rashes, infertility, miscarriage, birth defects, and leukemia or other cancers may be associated with working with or near hazardous drugs.2

Austin, TX-Oncology formulary management is a complex process requiring a structured approach and multidisciplinary engagement, according to Lindsey B. Amerine, PharmD, MS, BCPS, who spoke at the 11th annual Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association conference.
The Jefferson School of Pharmacy at Thomas Jefferson University was founded in 2008 and offers an innovative doctor of pharmacy program that prepares graduates for interesting and challenging pharmacy practice roles across the healthcare continuum.
The toxic effects and safe handling of hazardous drugs are issues of major concern to healthcare professionals.
This article discusses approaches that have been used to examine potentially adverse outcomes in healthcare professionals who work with or are exposed to chemotherapy drugs: (1) the use of biomarkers to evaluate genotoxic damage; (2) adverse reproductive outcomes; and (3) the association of cancer with exposure to chemotherapy drugs.
This article describes sources of workplace contamination with hazardous drugs and how healthcare workers may be exposed to hazardous drugs during the course of their duties.
This article describes sources of workplace contamination with hazardous drugs and how healthcare workers may be exposed to hazardous drugs during the course of their duties.
This is the first in a series of articles that will discuss issues related to hazardous materials in the workplace.

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