Colorectal Cancer

The addition of the PD-1 inhibitor durvalumab (Imfinzi) and the CTLA-4 inhibitor tremelimu­mab to best supportive care improved overall survival (OS) by >2 months compared with best supportive care alone in patients with advanced refractory colorectal cancer (CRC), according to results of the phase 2 Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) CO.26 clinical trial.

The FDA granted accelerated approval to nivolumab based on a notable clinical benefit in a subset of patients who progressed after receiving the standard first-line chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and irinote­can.

A starting dose of regorafenib (Stivarga) 80 mg daily with dose escalation to 160 mg daily was better tolerated than starting at 160 mg daily, with a trend toward improved survival in the management of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

Over­whelming evidence supports a chemo­preventive benefit of aspirin on colorectal cancer (CRC), and a potential effect on other cancers and cardiovascular risk.
The WCGIC chairperson, professor Eric Van Cutsem, MD, PhD, heads the Division of Digestive Oncology at University Hospitals Leuven and KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. He describes the difference between left- and right-sided colon cancers in terms of prognosis and response to therapy.
Results of a phase 3 study of an investigational monoclonal antibody, MABp1 (Xilonix; XBiotech), evaluated for cachexia in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), revealed a surprising finding: patients in the experimental arm showed a trend toward increased overall survival (an end point difficult to reach in any treatment-refractory cancer), with pharmacodynamics activity consistent with this result, investigators reported at the 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, held in San Francisco, CA.
The clinical response to regorafenib does not depend on tumor mutations. Among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who participated in the phase 3 CORRECT (Colorectal Cancer Treated With Regorafenib or Placebo After Failure of Standard Therapy) study, an analysis of tumor specimens for KRAS and PIK3CA mutations did not predict clinical benefit in the patients assigned to regorafenib compared with placebo, said Michael Jeffers, PhD. He presented the results of the study at the 2013 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium.

In recent years, researchers have considered a potential link between beta-blockers and a decreased risk of cancer. This theory stems from the fact that beta-blockers inhibit the actions of the stress hormone norepinephrine. This, along with studies that found norepinephrine can promote the growth and spread of cancer cells, led researchers to reason that the beta-blockers could have anticancer properties.

However, a recent study published early online in Cancer revealed that the use of beta-blockers showed no reduction of colorectal cancer risk.

In recent years, researchers have considered a potential link between beta-blockers and a decreased risk of cancer. This theory stems from the fact that beta-blockers inhibit the actions of the stress hormone norepinephrine. This, along with studies that found norepinephrine can promote the growth and spread of cancer cells, led researchers to reason that the beta-blockers could have anticancer properties.

However, a recent study published early online in Cancer revealed that the use of beta-blockers showed no reduction of colorectal cancer risk.

Updated analysis of disease-free survival (DFS) in the NO16968 trial confirms a survival benefit with the addition of oxaliplatin in adjuvant treatment of stage III colorectal cancer. The study compared XELOX (capecitabine plus oxaliplatin) versus bolus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (5-FU/LV) in 1886 patients with resected stage III colon cancer, and the updated analysis was based on a median follow-up of 7 years.

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