Hematologic Cancers

Daratumumab therapy is successful in patients with multiple myeloma who have received ≥3 previous lines of therapy, including a proteasome inhibitor and an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD), or whose disease is double-refractory to those other drugs.
In 2015, the combination of bortez­omib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone was shown to improve survival outcomes versus lenalidomide and dexamethasone alone in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. However, this triplet therapy also increased patients’ risk for severe peripheral neuropathy.
Daratumumab is a human CD38 IgGκ monoclonal antibody that demonstrated significant activity and a manageable safety profile when used in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.
Limited real-world evidence is available to describe the recent trends in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment costs and outcomes.
Daratumumab demonstrated superior efficacy when combined with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone compared with lenalidomide and dexamethasone alone in a prespecified interim analysis of a randomized phase 3 clinical trial of patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.
A novel compound called CPX-351 that combines 2 older drugs (cytarabine and daunorubicin) in a new drug-delivery platform improved survival among older patients with newly diagnosed, high-risk (secondary) acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

Hollywood, FL—In a study presented at the 2016 annual conference of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, a real-world assessment of lenalidomide use in the treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) showed that dose modifications had a strong positive effect on outcomes.

Chicago, IL—A novel compound called CPX-351 that combines 2 older drugs (cytarabine and daunorubicin) in a new drug-delivery platform improved survival among older patients with newly diagnosed, high-risk (secondary) acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to results of a phase 3 trial presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2016 Annual Meeting.

Lymphomas, cancers that begin in lymphatic cells of the immune system, can be divided into 2 main categories: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Hodgkin lymphoma is a fairly homogeneous disease characterized by the presence of Reed-Sternberg cells. Hodgkin lymphoma is far less common than NHL—approximately 8000 new Hodgkin lymphoma cases are diagnosed in the United States annually compared with over 70,000 new cases of NHL; more than 60 types of lymphoma are included in the NHL category.1 Presented below are a few facts about various forms of lymphoma.

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved nivolumab (Opdivo) for patients with classical Hodgkin Lymphoma that has progressed or relapsed following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and post-transplant brentuximab vedotin, according to an announcement by the agency. Notably, the intravenous drug was granted accelerated approval, and Breakthrough Therapy Designation.
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